Magnetometers

Disturbance Storm Time index

The Disturbance Storm Time (Dst) index is a measure of geomagnetic activity used to assess the severity of geomagnetic storms. It is expressed in nanoTeslas and is based on the average value of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field measured at four near-equatorial geomagnetic observatories. It measures the growth and recovery of the ring current in the Earth's magnetosphere. The lower these values get, the more energy is stored in Earth's magnetosphere.

Kiruna Magnetogram Help

This magnetogram gives you the values measured by the ground station of Kiruna (Sweden, Europa). For European middle latitude auroral activity the deflection in the magnetometer data should be more than 1300nT. If you are not located in Europe, please consult a magnetometer near your location for a more accurate representation of the current geomagnetic activity.

More data
K-index Deflection in nanoTesla Storm type
0 0 - 15 Quiet geomagnetic conditions
1 15 - 30 Quiet geomagnetic conditions
2 30 - 60 Quiet geomagnetic conditions
3 60 - 120 Unsettled geomagnetic conditions
4 120 - 210 Active geomagnetic conditions
5 210 - 360 G1 - Minor geomagnetic storm
6 360 - 600 G2 - Moderate geomagnetic storm
7 600 - 990 G3 - Strong geomagnetic storm
8 990 - 1500 G4 - Severe geomagnetic storm
9 1500 and more G5 - Extreme geomagnetic storm

Stackplot (Europe)

This plot shows several magnetometers that are located in Norway, Denmark and Finland, ranked according to their latitude. When a geomagnetic disturbance starts the most northern magnetometers will respond and as the disturbance strengthens the lower magnetometers will respond as well. Once the stations Dombås (DOB) and Solund (SOL) react, there will be a chance for the European middle latitudes to see aurora low at the northern horizon.

Data from Tromsø Geophysical Observatory (TGO), DTU Space (Technical University of Denmark) and Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI).

Magnetometer stackplots of TGO, DTU Space and FMI
More data
Code Name Location Geographic latitude Geographic longitude
NAL Ny-Ålesund Svalbard 78.92N 11.93E
LYR Longyearbyen Svalbard 78.20N 15.83E
HOP Hopen Svalbard 76.51N 25.01E
BJN Bjørnøya Svalbard 74.50N 19.00E
NOR Nordkapp Norway 71.09N 25.79E
SOR Sørøya Norway 70.54N 22.22E
TRO Tromsø Norway 69.66N 18.94E
KIL Kilpisjarvi Finland 69.07N, 20.76E
AND Andenes Norway 69.30N 16.03E
RST Røst Norway 67.52N 12.09E
JCK Jäckvik Sweden 66.40N 16.98E
DON Dønna Norway 66.11N 12.50E
RVK Rørvik Norway 64.95N 10.99E
DOB Dombås Norway 62.07N 9.11E
SOL Solund Norway 61.08N 4.84E
HAR Harestua Norway 60.21N 10.75E
KAR Karmøy Norway 59.21N 5.24E
BFE Brorfelde Denmark 55.63N 11.67E
ROE Rømø Denmark 55.17N 8.55E
WIC Vienna Austria 47.92N 15.85E
TDC Tristan da Cunha South Atlantic -37.06N 347.68E

Stackplot (North America)

This plot shows several magnetometers that are located in North America, ranked according to their latitude. When a geomagnetic disturbance starts the most northern magnetometers will respond and as the disturbance strengthens the lower magnetometers will respond as well.

Data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Stackplot by the Tromsø Geophysical Observatory.

USGS stackplot
More data
Code Name Location Geographic latitude Geographic longitude
DED Deadhorse Alaska, United States 70.35N 148.79W
BRW Barrow Alaska, United States 71.32N 156.62W
CMO College, Fairbanks Alaska, United States 64.87N 147.85W
SIT Sitka Alaska, United States 57.05N 135.32W
NEW Newport, Colville National Forest Washington, United States 48.26N 117.12W
KGI King George Island King Sejong Station, Antarctica 62.13S 58.46W
SHU Shumagin, Sand Point (Popof) Alaska, United States 55.34N 160.46W
BOU Boulder Colorado, United States 40.13N 105.23W
FRD Fredericksburg, Corbin Virginia, United States 38.20N 77.37W
BSL Stennis Space Center Mississippi, United States 30.35N 89.63W
FRN Fresno, O'Neals California, United States 37.09N 119.71W
TUC Tucson Arizona, United States 32.17N 110.73W
SJG San Juan Cayey, Puerto Rico 18.11N 66.14W
HON Honolulu, Ewa Beach Hawaii, United States 21.31N 157.99W
GUA Guam, Dededo Western Pacific Ocean 13.58N 144.86E

Launceston (Australia)

This magnetogram gives you the values measured by the ground station of Launceston (Australia, Tasmania). If you are not located in Australia or New Zealand, please consult a magnetometer near your location for a more accurate representation of the current geomagnetic activity. Additional southern hemisphere magnetometer and K-index plots can be found under the dropdown buttons.

Credit: Geoscience Australia, University of Newcastle Space Physics Group, Australian Government Antarctic Division and International Center for Space Weather Science and Education, Japan.

GOES

This plot shows the 1-minute averaged parallel component of the magnetic field in nanoTeslas, measured by the GOES satellites. A daily variation is observed in these data because at geosynchronous orbit, the magnetic field is stronger on the dayside of Earth and weaker on the nightside. If the data drops below zero when the satellite is on the dayside, it may be due to a compression of the Earth’s magnetopause into the geosynchronous orbit boundaries. On the nightside, the smaller field values indicate strong currents in the magnetotail that are often associated with the stretching and subsequent release of energy in Earths tail which result in aurora on Earth. Noon and midnight local time are plotted as N and M.

Credit: NOAA SWPC.

More magnetometers

Current data suggest that it is not possible to see aurora now at middle latitudes

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