Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hey Community.

 

Today I'm watching the new Sunspot, and at first when it rolled into earth view, it decayed. 

Now, it looks like its growing again. How is that possible?  Does it now count as a bigger threat for big solar flares? Sorry, im new to spaceweather. :)

is there any way to predict if it will decay again? I saw your update on Facebook and wondered if you maybe could do them more often. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is natural for sunspots to wax and wane until they fade out of existence. It's kind of like a thunder storm, only in the sense that it could go as quickly as it came, or it could last for a long time, or its remnants could bloom into yet another wave of convection.

Remember, though, that sunspots inhibit convection of the plasma around the surface of the sun, and therefore heating and cooling take place at very uneven rates; in its attempt to reach equilibrium, it instead amplified the total entropy and thus we have a more interesting phenomenon to observe.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks alot for your answer Christopher! 

I'd love to hear more. Im really interested.

Do you think it will get even bigger now? It grew 1 more tiny sunspot i think!

Btw: i have a problem figuring out if something is only active or a real sunspot, any tips?:) ty!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

A great supplementary source of information about sunspots, coronal holes, and events throughout the day, in addition to some archived information throughout the years(in case you feel like digging in to the nitty gritty) is this website: http://www.solen.info/solar/

I usually come to the Space Weather Live website first, to see anything worth seeing. If there appears to be activity, I then check that website for annotated insight as to the current events.

This sunspot has evolved quite rapidly, so I do think it has a chance of getting larger, and even producing some small, but meaningful flares. The bigger it gets, the higher the chance for an M-class flare, and those are always exciting :) Whenever this happens to a sunspot rotating towards Earth, it does beg our attention. It is still all one sunspot, and it receives a designation based on the magnetic configuration of the spot - see more here: https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/help/the-magnetic-classification-of-sunspots

As for it being active/real, Solen does a decent job of commenting on the matter, however, you may observe the various SDO images and GOES images to get near-real time perspective of what the sunspot is doing, whether it be filaments, loops, or coronal holes. Use this to help understand the information you get from SWPC, Solen, and Space Weather Live!

Edited by Christopher S.
Clarified language
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The region has still a fairly simple magnetic structure so even with the current development it doesn't pose a risk in solar flares. It's nice to see a region of the new cycle that lives long enough and after it's decay grew again. If it gets more complex, chances will rise for C-class flares.

Solen is indeed a good source, it has a good automated spot detection and I used it a lot in the past. At SpaceWeatherLive we also do in depth analysis once the region has gained a potential for increased risk on strong solar flares. Once a region is complex enough we always do our Delta spot search and do the analysis in a news update. It's also possible to learn this by visiting our help section and read the articles about the magnetic classification of sunspots and the classification of spots, but it requires some training so please follow the sources and you'll learn quickly enough to judge if a region has potential. Also browse around the solar activity forum, Im sure there are some very good topics of active regions where we discussed active regions.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Vancanneyt!

By the way, do you need help with German translation of the Site? Im fluent :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 uren geleden, KimSeokjin zei:

Thanks Vancanneyt!

By the way, do you need help with German translation of the Site? Im fluent :)

We sure can use some help with the German translation! I've send you a private message with some information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Guys.

 

A little Question

 

What does this striped line beside Region 2765 mean/resemble in the Solar Synoptic map? I tried looking for it in their About and History section, but only found a legend for Plages and Filaments.

https://imgur.com/4vyqFPw Here you can see which ones i mean! :) 

 

PS: Do you think it will grow further or decay soon? does it still look simple? (To me it still looks simple because alot of it is Plage according to SDO

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The line is the separation between the two polarities (positive and negative side). If you can easily draw a line between the spots magnetic polarities we have a beta region. So still magnetically simple, not much development in the trailing spots so I don’t expect much.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you also agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy.