Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
The Norwegian

First spotless day versus Solar minimum

Recommended Posts

A while back I predicted that SC24 would reach its minimum by 2021/22.

Today I found some interesting data which might support this. In the attached table you can find the time from the first day with spotless sun, up to solar minimum. In particulare SC12-15 is similar with SC23/24.

SC23/24 had its first spotless day in january 2004, and reach its minimum in december 2008, about 60 month. This is very similar with SC12 with +/- 66 months from day one with spotless sun to solar minimum.

Question is, will this continue in the transit between SC24/25?? And of course, will this trend continue in the following 2 solar cycles?

in june 2016 came the first day of spotless sun in the transition between SC24-25. If the trend of +/- 66 months continues, we can expect the current solar minimum to reach its minimum in late 2021.

Any thoughts ??

 

image.thumb.png.486e760107c4999919e82989441f4f9c.png

Edited by The Norwegian
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, The Norwegian said:

A while back I predicted that SC24 would reach its minimum by 2021/22.

 

Edited by theartist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets pictorially look at the two epochs represented in your table.  The first epoch from the table we define as the period April 1850-June 1913; the second we define as the period November 1941-May 1996. The sunspot activity (per ISN) of those two epochs are presented in the figures below:

372064290_ScreenShot2020-01-10at5_50_07PM.thumb.png.23fd5819065b3d2c892eed8bad0e99ee.png235693840_ScreenShot2020-01-10at5_49_51PM.thumb.png.c009bfd359f9ce10bea8b69aa909b8ed.png.

The first epoch (top figure) consists of weaker sunspot cycles, with prolonged minimums containing more spotless days. 

 

15 hours ago, The Norwegian said:

A while back I predicted that SC24 would reach its minimum by 2021/22.

How did you arrive at that prediction?  It had something to do with barycenter analysis?

Edited by theartist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, theartist said:

Lets pictorially look at the two epochs represented in your table.  The first epoch from the table we define as the period April 1850-June 1913; the second we define as the period November 1941-May 1996. The sunspot activity (per ISN) of those two epochs are presented in the figures below:

372064290_ScreenShot2020-01-10at5_50_07PM.thumb.png.23fd5819065b3d2c892eed8bad0e99ee.png235693840_ScreenShot2020-01-10at5_49_51PM.thumb.png.c009bfd359f9ce10bea8b69aa909b8ed.png.

The first epoch (top figure) consists of weaker sunspot cycles, with prolonged minimums containing more spotless days. 

 

How did you arrive at that prediction?  It had something to do with barycenter analysis?

Yes, thats almost correct. My prediction had nothing to do with this data many cycles back, however, I have been looking at the length of last solar minimum which had 7 full years of spotless days of some kind. And now we have 3.5 years so far in this minimum. Ad that this minimum is predicted to be weaker(Zharkova). My prediction was based on all of this, including barycenter analysis and position of our planets. Without this data for the earlier cycles, that is just data who points in my predictions direction. In my opinion of course. 

Edited by The Norwegian
posting first time by mistake, wasnt finished

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, The Norwegian said:

My prediction had nothing to do with this data...I have been looking at the length of last solar minimum which had 7 full years of spotless days of some kind. And now we have 3.5 years so far in this minimum. Ad that this minimum is predicted to be weaker(Zharkova). My prediction was based on all of this, including barycenter analysis and position of our planets. Without this data for the earlier cycles, that is just data who points in my predictions direction.

This data you brought up, which I plotted above, may very well suggest your prediction has possibilities of coming to fruition. This data appears to reflect the prolonged Gleissberg Minimum that occurred back around the beginning of the 20th century (see following figure); Capricopia discussed this in this comment on a different thread.  

1241198918_GleissbergMinimumslide_3.thumb.jpg.62c9eadd4856ea2612757ad03915db29.jpg(graph source).

Your prediction is "SC24 would reach its minimum by 2021/22".  That suggests you think Solar Minimum Nadir (SMN) could be clear out in 2022. Your follow-on statement had a more specific location of SMN, when you state, "If the trend of +/- 66 months continues, we can expect the current solar minimum to reach its minimum in late 2021."   (Recall, Kitiashvili also forecasted SMN would possibly occur sometime as far out as 2021 with the following statement from her presentation, "a deep extended solar activity minimum is expected in about 2019-2021"; for more info on this, see 2. The 'Kitiashvili/NASA Forecast'  in this comment on a different thread). 

Obviously 'The Norwegian', if you are correct with your prediction, you possibly have uncovered a methodology that could be a huge contribution to the field of solar physics.  However, you state, "My prediction had nothing to do with this data."  Therefore, in order to clearly understand your thought process into how you arrived at your prediction (so that it is possibly repeatably-useful in the future), please further clarify what exactly is the reasoning/process that went into arriving at your prediction.  

My understanding, so far, on how you arrived at your prediction are the following reasons:

  1. You observed SC23/24 "had 7 full years of spotless days", and concluded (citing additional reasons below) that SC24/25 also had the possibility for a 7-yr spotless days period.
  2. You took specifically Zharkova's past opinion/work into account, whereby she stated that the next minimum "is predicted to be weaker".
  3. You looked at "barycenter analysis and position of our planets".

I'll now evaluate each of the three reasons above in order, that we may mutually understand where further clarification in your process is needed.  

  • Reason 1, by itself, is not useful for prediction.  Your prediction of SMN occurring in late 2021 would result in SC24 having a duration of almost 13 years, and yet the average cycle duration of the first group of cycles in your table (those possessing a long spotless delay of ~66 months), Solar Cycles 10-15, is only 11.3 years.  The historical record likely shows that one cycle with a long period of spotless days does not always result in the next cycle having a long string of spotless days.
  • Reason 2 based on Zharkova's past opinion/work is not very definitive, since she has over the years changed (updated?) her reasoning as to why she thinks SC25 will be weaker.  Per my understanding, at one time she was attributing a weak SC25 (and a potentially imminent Grand Solar Minimum?) to cancellation of two hemispherical dynamos within the sun.  She later included Barycenter and Solar Inertial Moment analysis into her work in order to be more inclusive with hind-casting results.  However, I haven't yet found where she predicts the location of the SMN of the SC24/25 transition, but she did predict "reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26” in this paper: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-637X/795/1/46.
  • Because there is nothing significant in Reason 1 or Reason 2 that stands out as to how you could back up your prediction, Reason 3 is where the 'secret-sauce' needs to be revealed to see if it has any merit.  I have not found an online source for Barycenter simulation.  There is a software program for Barycenter analysis available at this link, http://arnholm.org/astro/sun/sc24/sim2/index.html, but it only works on limited operating systems.  Did you use that software in your analysis?  If so, can you at least provide some descriptive images and explanation as to how it was used in arriving at your prediction?  You also state "position of planets" factored into your prediction, so if that means something beyond your Barycenter analysis, can you please be specific on the planet positions?
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, theartist said:

This data you brought up, which I plotted above, may very well suggest your prediction has possibilities of coming to fruition. This data appears to reflect the prolonged Gleissberg Minimum that occurred back around the beginning of the 20th century (see following figure); Capricopia discussed this in this comment on a different thread.  

1241198918_GleissbergMinimumslide_3.thumb.jpg.62c9eadd4856ea2612757ad03915db29.jpg(graph source).

Your prediction is "SC24 would reach its minimum by 2021/22".  That suggests you think Solar Minimum Nadir (SMN) could be clear out in 2022. Your follow-on statement had a more specific location of SMN, when you state, "If the trend of +/- 66 months continues, we can expect the current solar minimum to reach its minimum in late 2021."   (Recall, Kitiashvili also forecasted SMN would possibly occur sometime as far out as 2021 with the following statement from her presentation, "a deep extended solar activity minimum is expected in about 2019-2021"; for more info on this, see 2. The 'Kitiashvili/NASA Forecast'  in this comment on a different thread). 

Obviously 'The Norwegian', if you are correct with your prediction, you possibly have uncovered a methodology that could be a huge contribution to the field of solar physics.  However, you state, "My prediction had nothing to do with this data."  Therefore, in order to clearly understand your thought process into how you arrived at your prediction (so that it is possibly repeatably-useful in the future), please further clarify what exactly is the reasoning/process that went into arriving at your prediction.  

My understanding, so far, on how you arrived at your prediction are the following reasons:

  1. You observed SC23/24 "had 7 full years of spotless days", and concluded (citing additional reasons below) that SC24/25 also had the possibility for a 7-yr spotless days period.
  2. You took specifically Zharkova's past opinion/work into account, whereby she stated that the next minimum "is predicted to be weaker".
  3. You looked at "barycenter analysis and position of our planets".

I'll now evaluate each of the three reasons above in order, that we may mutually understand where further clarification in your process is needed.  

  • Reason 1, by itself, is not useful for prediction.  Your prediction of SMN occurring in late 2021 would result in SC24 having a duration of almost 13 years, and yet the average cycle duration of the first group of cycles in your table (those possessing a long spotless delay of ~66 months), Solar Cycles 10-15, is only 11.3 years.  The historical record likely shows that one cycle with a long period of spotless days does not always result in the next cycle having a long string of spotless days.
  • Reason 2 based on Zharkova's past opinion/work is not very definitive, since she has over the years changed (updated?) her reasoning as to why she thinks SC25 will be weaker.  Per my understanding, at one time she was attributing a weak SC25 (and a potentially imminent Grand Solar Minimum?) to cancellation of two hemispherical dynamos within the sun.  She later included Barycenter and Solar Inertial Moment analysis into her work in order to be more inclusive with hind-casting results.  However, I haven't yet found where she predicts the location of the SMN of the SC24/25 transition, but she did predict "reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26” in this paper: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0004-637X/795/1/46.
  • Because there is nothing significant in Reason 1 or Reason 2 that stands out as to how you could back up your prediction, Reason 3 is where the 'secret-sauce' needs to be revealed to see if it has any merit.  I have not found an online source for Barycenter simulation.  There is a software program for Barycenter analysis available at this link, http://arnholm.org/astro/sun/sc24/sim2/index.html, but it only works on limited operating systems.  Did you use that software in your analysis?  If so, can you at least provide some descriptive images and explanation as to how it was used in arriving at your prediction?  You also state "position of planets" factored into your prediction, so if that means something beyond your Barycenter analysis, can you please be specific on the planet positions?

As I said before, I do this just as an hobby. This is not my profession! But I will try to answer some of your questions.

And once more, my English is not the best, and this is a difficult topic :) 

1. I have of course study all earlier cycles. Compared the dates of all minimums/Maximums back to about 1730 or so, compared this the position of the planets an so on, but this particulare list of data showing the timeline from the first spotless day, to the solar minimum was new to me.

2. I have read several of V. Zharkovas papers, very interesting by the way. I had my idea about Solar system barycenter before I read it in the last paper from Zharkova last summer. According to Zharkovas predictions we will reach solar minimum in 2020, so my prediction stands a less to no chance that this minimum will keep on going 2 more years, but still... 

3. I believe that Jupiter has an tidal force effect on the Sun. The Jupiter/Sun "Center of Gravity" is shifting from inside the surface of the sun to outside the surface of the Sun. This has an effect on the strenght to the tidalwave Jupiter is causing on the Sun, which is the force needed to create sunspots. This tidalwave is increasing/decreasing in strenght during an 11 year cycle, and probably in longer cycles too.

The Solar system Center of Gravity is also shifting, due to the 4 outer planets, mostly due to Jupiter of course. In 2022 these planets are in a position that they pull Center of Gravity away longest from the sun. (best explanation I managed :))

Jupiter, probably Saturn too, has an tidal force on the sun, that causing the innerplanets(I dont now about mars, but..) to "pull" out sunspots. The last 9 mnd Earth, Venus and Mercury has made smaller and smaller sunspots each time they pass either Jupiter, or each other. During Solar Maximum each inner planet "pull out" sunspots, and dont need to combine forces to do so like during Solar minimum. Just like the full moon are causing spring tide on our planet. (The Moon and the Sun are pulling togehter, and make spring tide together :) )

To make it clear, I dont believe that the actual "point of Gravity" do something, but when this is shifting, the tidalforce caused by Jupiter on the Sun is decreasing/increasing.

See printscreen from solar motion simulator showing the path from 2018-2024. To the left you see the large planets and their position.

 

 image.thumb.png.861d168359ff3f307baebd6bcd24af5a.png

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Norwegian said:

I do this just as an hobby. This is not my profession!

That is not so much important, at this point, since many breakthroughs in science have been made in the past by non-professional amateurs not beholden to a paycheck.

1 hour ago, The Norwegian said:

English is not the best, and this is a difficult topic

I understand (and can hardly be empathetic to your plight, since English is my language, and yet it can be rather laborious for me to put my thoughts down into legible concepts.) Nonetheless, accuracy in conveyance of scientific ideas is quite important. So I'm not trying to put you on-the-spot; rather, consider my questioning ('grilling') as an aid in trying to get your ideas out-in-the-open, under scientific rigor.

1 hour ago, The Norwegian said:

According to Zharkovas predictions we will reach solar minimum in 2020, so my prediction stands a less to no chance that this minimum will keep on going 2 more years, but still... 

Your ideas currently, until proven otherwise, may be on an equal-footing with Zharkova's, but it remains to be seen what exactly your theory is. Your theory will (or will not) stand on its own merit regardless of varying opinions from other scientists. (BTW, can you please cite which paper Zharkova claims SMN is in 2020?)  If you think Zharkova is also using Barycenter analysis but coming to a different conclusion as to when SMN is, then it would be nice to try and understand what the differences between your two analyses are, that bring you to different conclusions.

In order to try and convey your theory with complete understanding and accuracy, I studied your last message, and the following is a summary of my understanding of your theory:

"The Norwegian's Theory" explaining the reasons sunspots manifest and why SMN will likely occur out in 2021-2022:

  1. Jupiter (probably Saturn too) imparts a tidal-wave-force on the sun that enables the inner-planets (with or without the exception of Mars) to "pull" out sunspots.
  2. The strength of the tidal-wave-force (which Jupiter imparts on the sun and is the force needed to create sunspots) is affected by the Jupiter/Sun* Center-of-Gravity (CoG) shifting from inside-the-surface-of-the-sun to outside-the-surface-of-the-Sun. (It is when shifting of the CoG occurs that the tidal-wave-force decreases/increases.)
  3. *(Note, the shifting of the Solar system 'Center-of-Gravity' is influenced by all four (4) of the outer planets, but is mostly due to Jupiter.)
  4. The tidal-wave-force is increasing/decreasing in magnitude during an 11-year cycle (and probably in longer cycles too), due to the shifting of the CoG.
  5. During Solar Maximum, each inner planet can individually "pull out" sunspots, and they don't need to combine forces (with other planets) like they need to during Solar Minimum.
  6. In 2022, the four outer planets are in a position such that they pull the Center-of-Gravity (i.e., the solar system Center-of-Mass) the farthest away from the sun in its orbital trajectory.

In the above summary, I basically just reassembled and consolidated your thoughts for clarity.  Is what I wrote above indeed your theory?  Does it need any corrections, clarifications, additions?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/12/2020 at 3:29 AM, theartist said:

"The Norwegian's Theory" explaining the reasons sunspots manifest and why SMN will likely occur out in 2021-2022:

  1. Jupiter (probably Saturn too) imparts a tidal-wave-force on the sun that enables the inner-planets (with or without the exception of Mars) to "pull" out sunspots.
  2. The strength of the tidal-wave-force (which Jupiter imparts on the sun and is the force needed to create sunspots) is affected by the Jupiter/Sun* Center-of-Gravity (CoG) shifting from inside-the-surface-of-the-sun to outside-the-surface-of-the-Sun. (It is when shifting of the CoG occurs that the tidal-wave-force decreases/increases.)
  3. *(Note, the shifting of the Solar system 'Center-of-Gravity' is influenced by all four (4) of the outer planets, but is mostly due to Jupiter.)
  4. The tidal-wave-force is increasing/decreasing in magnitude during an 11-year cycle (and probably in longer cycles too), due to the shifting of the CoG.
  5. During Solar Maximum, each inner planet can individually "pull out" sunspots, and they don't need to combine forces (with other planets) like they need to during Solar Minimum.
  6. In 2022, the four outer planets are in a position such that they pull the Center-of-Gravity (i.e., the solar system Center-of-Mass) the farthest away from the sun in its orbital trajectory.

In the above summary, I basically just reassembled and consolidated your thoughts for clarity.  Is what I wrote above indeed your theory?  Does it need any corrections, clarifications, additions?

I dont beileve that V. Zharkova has stated "this solar minimum ends in 2020", but she has in her video presentations stated that this Grand solar minimum is starting in 2020, and of course her results of principal component analysis of magnetic waves on the Sun, which I believe is caused by Jupiter :). Find the results of her results attach below.

1636308013_Zharkovaanalasys.thumb.png.178309c1e9f5ab36eff688b7d8dfe4d8.png

Image source: Simon J. Shepherd, Sergei I. Zharkov, Valentina V. Zharkova

I think you had most of your summary in Place. I would like to add that I also believe that the inclination of both Jupiter and Saturns orbit is what causes the polarity shift from South to North and then back to South to make an full solar cycle (22y).

I also will add that if CoG is too far out, or too far into the Sun this may causes minimum. But this is not "written in stone". There are of course other forces that influence this, like the tidalwave force of all four big planets.

Edited by The Norwegian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is something which I think is related to your post here. It has to do with the current Oulo graph. This could well be the peak of the gcr count for this minimum. If so it looks like it will be around 2 years from now before we see sunspots around midway to the next max according to the average length of time after the gcr peak.My prediction for sunspots was that they would show up steadily around July/Sept of this year. That is a best guess.

One other thought, the polarity of sunspots changes every cycle. Is that why the profile of the Oulo graph changes with each cycle? Starting with the first peak shown on the graph every other cycle shows a similar somewhat pointed peak. Then the other 2 cycles have flat to rounded peaks just like what is currently seen on Oulo.

Lastly at theartist, this last weekend from the 10th to the 12th was pretty wild. There were 3 strong volcanic eruptions, and the strongest quake in 100 years in Puerto Rico. The Taal volcano erupted to 55,000 feet. It last erupted in a series from 1965 to 1977. Other major eruptions were in Jan 1911, and May 1754. One thing in common with these 4 quakes is that they all occurred close to or during a solar minimum. The one on 1911 obviously is of interest given its occurrence takes place during that last Gleissberg cycle. So,  was this due to planetary alignments such as we had been discussing in the quake post? Makes me wonder what we will see around the 24th of this month.

 

 

418867160_monitor...121419.gif.25cc0c18e2026ce6f6961a9dbafe1015.gif

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, goldminor said:

Here is something which I think is related to your post here. It has to do with the current Oulo graph. This could well be the peak of the gcr count for this minimum. If so it looks like it will be around 2 years from now before we see sunspots around midway to the next max according to the average length of time after the gcr peak.My prediction for sunspots was that they would show up steadily around July/Sept of this year. That is a best guess.

One other thought, the polarity of sunspots changes every cycle. Is that why the profile of the Oulo graph changes with each cycle? Starting with the first peak shown on the graph every other cycle shows a similar somewhat pointed peak. Then the other 2 cycles have flat to rounded peaks just like what is currently seen on Oulo.

Lastly at theartist, this last weekend from the 10th to the 12th was pretty wild. There were 3 strong volcanic eruptions, and the strongest quake in 100 years in Puerto Rico. The Taal volcano erupted to 55,000 feet. It last erupted in a series from 1965 to 1977. Other major eruptions were in Jan 1911, and May 1754. One thing in common with these 4 quakes is that they all occurred close to or during a solar minimum. The one on 1911 obviously is of interest given its occurrence takes place during that last Gleissberg cycle. So,  was this due to planetary alignments such as we had been discussing in the quake post? Makes me wonder what we will see around the 24th of this month.

 

 

418867160_monitor...121419.gif.25cc0c18e2026ce6f6961a9dbafe1015.gif

I believe that we still dont see the peak :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, The Norwegian said:

I believe that we still dont see the peak :) 

That is entirely possible. Can't help but note the low total count for this minimum. There should be another 150 days or more of spotless days, imo.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, goldminor said:

One other thought, the polarity of sunspots changes every cycle. Is that why the profile of the Oulo graph changes with each cycle? Starting with the first peak shown on the graph every other cycle shows a similar somewhat pointed peak. Then the other 2 cycles have flat to rounded peaks just like what is currently seen on Oulo.

This is a great observation.  Cycle 20, an even-cycle, had a higher GCR peak than the following rounded odd-cycle, Cycle 21.  Cycle 20 ISN Peak (in 1968-11) was 157; Cycle 21 ISN Peak was 233 (in 1979-12).  Cycle 22, an even-cycle, had a higher GCR peak than the following rounded odd-cycle, Cycle 23.  Cycle 22 ISN Peak (in 1989-11) was 214; Cycle 23 ISN Peak was 180 (in 2001-11).  The planetary positions, impacting the Quality Factor of the Heliosphere Resonant Cavity, in conjunction with the polarity of the heliospheric current sheet, will factor into the resultant GCR load.  Others might suggest that additionally, the GCR load varies outside the heliosheath with variation in the Interstellar Medium. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello I'm new here,

Whats up with the Sun? Do I must worry about the activity especial in future? The sunspots of the new cycle was no great activity. Is this normaly?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, goldminor said:

Lastly at theartist, this last weekend from the 10th to the 12th was pretty wild. There were 3 strong volcanic eruptions, and the strongest quake in 100 years in Puerto Rico. The Taal volcano erupted to 55,000 feet. It last erupted in a series from 1965 to 1977. Other major eruptions were in Jan 1911, and May 1754.

Did you check the 1911 eruption on Jan 27?>>>A Jupiter-Saturn superior conjunction with a Neptune-Uranus superior conjunction!  Wow!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are three separate theories being investigated on this forum, and they don't always agree:

  1. My theory, (i.e, 'theartist' theory) on 'planetary clocking' rationalizes observed solar magnetic activity (like sunspots). It overwhelmingly attributes changes in observed solar magnetic activity to changes in the electromagnetic (EM) impedance within the heliosphere, and it considers those EM impedance changes are primarily due to changes in planetary positions.  My theory considers tidal and gravitational force effects from planetary positioning to be practically inconsequential to sunspots when compared to planetary positional effects on EM impedance changes within the heliosphere.  (Trivially, there is an indirect relationship of gravity which primarily determines the positioning of the planets, but my theory says the resultant tidal forces from those positions have little to do with observed solar activity when compared to their effects on EM impedance changes.)    
  2. 'The Norwegian' theory, which is the subject of this thread, also looks at reasons for observed solar magnetic activity (like sunspots).  However, in contrast to the theory by 'theartist', his theory is primarily based on Barycenter analysis, which is governed by the gravitational force. 
  3. Goldminor has been looking at quakes and volcanoes for years, and now, after finding this forum, is noticing there may be some coincidences(?) between quakes and volcanoes and planetary alignments. 

I repeat this clarification here primarily for the newcomers or casual observers, because some casual observer (troll?) had the audacity to come on to the forum a couple of weeks ago and claim it was obvious to them that I was predicting a Grand Solar Minimum (GSM).  It is laughable to think that anyone could come to that conclusion after actually reading my posts. After all, one of the very first things I discussed on this forum was something I called a 'Bremen Metric' that was indicating to me (at the time), clear back in the beginning of 2019, that SC24 Solar Minimum Nadir (SMN) had already passed and consequently, a SMN occurring clear back in early 2019 was quickly going to put an end to the Grand Solar Minimum talk.  Nonetheless, in the pursuit of scientific excellence, I considered alternate theories in arriving at my own.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a thought which I wrote down in late 2015. I thought that both of you might find this of interest. Of special interest, scroll down towards the last paragraphs, and note how well I predicted the course of the rest of SC 24. I point to that as my forecasts/predictions are my only credentials which I have, other than being gifted with a pretty good inner computer. So this is my way of showing that I can see part of the picture. Also of note, I am the only person to ever see the close correlation between excess hemispheric sunspots and temp changes in the ENSO regions. I have always had an odd way, at times, of getting to the heart of a given subject. Over at WUWT I eventually became known as the wiggle matcher. Now I can claim an advanced Wiggle Matcher. ... https://goldminor.wordpress.com/2015/11/19/my-analysis-of-the-sunoceanenso-connection/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you also agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy.