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Aeon

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Aeon last won the day on May 18

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  1. It will take at least another year, probably longer, before the end of the solar minimum. It is enough to see how COVID19 will behave before and after. I'm not sure we're still at the lowest point, but that's just my personal guess.
  2. @VoltarDarkWhat kind of ice? They seem to me to be somewhat vague terms when describing comets in this way. @Rob TodaroThe effects as a whole would be unpleasant, we can move on to a period of multiple epidemics of various epidemics (historical data). In 1918 two pandemics occurred: lethargic encephalitis, Spanish flu.
  3. Personally I find it an impossible theory. Maybe tardigrade, but very difficult. -Temperature lower than - 200 C. - Solar radiation from flare and solar wind. -Radiation of space. - Absence of water or forms of feeding. * Even if they are hibernated, in these conditions, can they last for years, centuries, millennia, millions of years? -The atmosphere they find compatible? -Resistance to the thermosphere. -Resistance to other microbial life forms? That's why I'm so skeptical.
  4. I do not doubt the role of ultraviolet radiation in contrasting pathogens. However, what I disagree with is the fact that it is considered a central factor when there are clearly viruses that are able to resist. As for algae, I'm not sure, but I know that studies have shown that space radiation increases the growth of trees. So why not other types of vegetation? https://nph.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.03060.x
  5. @VoltarDark Scarlet Fever https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/scarlet-fever-scourge-of-the-19th-century-is-coming-back-1622990.html https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/new-strain-scarlet-fever-first-21743473 African Swin Fever https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/10/16/terrible-pandemic-is-killing-pigs-around-world-us-pork-producers-fear-they-could-be-next/ Measles https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/26/health/measles-outbreak-epidemic.html
  6. We must take into account the fact of the seasonal variations that affect viruses precisely because of the terrestrial inclination. This is why many viruses thrive in the winter and the summer sucks. UV radiation certainly has its harmful effects. But I'm not the serial killer of all the viruses we know. Take for example the Spanish flu in 1918, or the sweat fever of 1500, to those viruses the summer did not give any problem. Looking at the graph shown above, the IST has certainly fallen in recent decades, certainly 50 years. In all honesty I am not too worried about a second wave of COVID19, now prevention is rooted in society, but I believe there are at least three other epidemics that should be paid attention to. As I see it, high levels of space radiation are dangerous and the topic deserves special attention from the origin to their effects in general. This is the only way to understand what you are talking about.
  7. @Ron NL These are magnetic fields that form on the surface of the sun. They produce visible sunspots only if sufficiently intense. However, as long as the dark spots are visible, they are not counted as sun spots.
  8. @Ron NLI followed the trend of these proto-sunspots for a few days, I think the reason why they are not counted is because the real sunspots are not yet visible. Perhaps they have already formed behind the Sun and are weakening or still developing. Let's wait and see.
  9. @goldminor I'm sorry for what happened to you. Even my granddaughter had a relative of hers among the victims of this pandemic. I think this minimum will probably end in the summer of 2021, however now with the arrival of summer things should improve considerably. If he returns in the fall, we would all be prepared now, thanks to prevention. I'm sure you're right to be tested for the vaccine.
  10. 1) I don't doubt it. But there have also been numerous cases in which the infected have tested positive even after months, as in Italy. 2) As far as the mortality rate and solar cycles are concerned, it is a higher rate of mutations of the virus itself which makes it more difficult to fight the immune system. If you had read the original link of this thread you would have already understood it. I have not excluded anything from what you explain. The virus has existed for years and its mutation is what made it epidemic and harmful to human well-being. Even the Spanish pandemic had been around for years in humans, before it appeared, as some scientific studies have explained. Although some claim it originated from pigs. For all the rest what I see is a matter of opinion. COVID19 was not born in the laboratory. There have always been virus mutations, however factors such as peaks in solar activity and higher levels of space radiation have a major impact on this process. To explain these physico-chemical processes, there are scientific studies on the topic, and these topics need correlative data. So far mentioned only to a small extent.
  11. @Christopher S. Extremely simplistic explanation, the fact that they have not been mentioned does not mean that it has been overlooked. The change was too sudden to use the antibody explanation. Do a search on your own on the appropriate specialized sites. I understand that those who healed afterwards must have devveloped them, but they range from a month with an exceptional peak of mortality, to the following month with a very low mortality rate, such as the Philadel phia example. The most accredited and common explanation I've seen so far is that the virus has mutated. It's not my problem if you don't agree with the subject, o con il thread. I also emphasize that studies have been done on these physical and chemical processes that you call "magical". Furthermore, nothing described above contradicts the work that the scientific community puts into practice to stem these problems.
  12. @VoltarDark Maybe English isn't perfect, and it wouldn't surprise me if I didn't make myself understood. Spare me your street boy sarcasm. What I want to point out is that the change in pandemic mortality has not been localized to a few nations, but has been global.
  13. The drop in mortality from the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918 occurred almost synchronized across the world. This meant that the virus had mutated into a less lethal version. Being that the collapse of mortality occurred worldwide, it means that a common factor globally has made it less lethal. Probably the collapse of solar activity. This reminds me of how COVID19 appears to have changed differently, and from pre-existing strains in different nations when neutron levels rose to 2009 levels. According to a study, the COVID19 virus has mutated into different strains. Researchers from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China found that COVID-19 has mutated in at least 30 different variants and that the new coronavirus' ability to mutate has been underestimated. The study analyzed the coronavirus strains that had infected 11 Hangzhou patients. The researchers found that there were many more mutations in the samples than previously reported. Within the sample, officials detected over 30 mutations, of which about 60% were new. Laboratory tests also found that some mutations resulted in deadly coronavirus strains. Sars-CoV-2 has acquired mutations capable of substantially changing its pathogenicity. The study also determined that the deadliest mutations in the sample group were also found in the coronavirus strain identified most frequently in Europe. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.14.20060160v1 In March 2020, Adriano Decarli, epidemiologist and professor of medical statistics at the University of Milan, said that between October and December last year there was a "significant" increase in the number of people hospitalized for pneumonia and influenza in areas of Milan and Lodi. He said he was unable to provide exact figures, but "hundreds" of more than usual people were brought to the hospital in the last three months of 2019 in those areas two of the most affected cities in Lombardy with pneumonia and similar symptoms. flu, and some of them were dead. This seems to highlight that this pandemic not only did not seem to have necessarily started in the People's Republic of China, but even the pre-existing virus could have mutated and spread in a different and independent way from different regions and then spread all over the world. https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-italy-timing-idUSKBN21D2IG The favorable time to induce these mutations uniformly across the world seems to have manifested itself synchronously when the neutron rate of space origin rose to 2009 levels. Namely: at the levels of the H1N1 pandemic. Interestingly, WHO says that COVID19 is 10 times worse than the H1N1 Pandemic. Indeed numbers and deaths confirm it. https://www.france24.com/en/20200413-who-says-covid-19-is-10-times-more-deadly-than-swine-flu This fact if we compare it with the levels of neutrons of spatial origin of the OULU graph, it doesn't make much sense. But if we compare it to the more reliable Russian monitor, it turns out that the neutron rate has already passed the 2009 level. A fact that highlights how this solar minimum is deeper.
  14. @goldminor I know this chart. It is worth noting that at that time there was not only the Spanish flu pandemic, but also another pandemic known as "Encephalitis lethargica". I don't know any details about introducing space dust into the atmosphere. As far as I know, this is an event that happens every year.
  15. @VoltarDark I limit myself to arguments which I have just explained.
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