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  1. Yesterday
  2. Vancanneyt Sander

    Recent Cycle #25 Sunspot

    The STAR is indeed a very good reference too, it also knows that NOAA isn't always that right and has it's own analysis and region designation as @Kaimbridge already noted. I always check them out for extra info so keep it in your bookmarks.
  3. Last week
  4. theartist

    Recent Cycle #25 Sunspot

    Attached is an image of the HMI Intensitygram snapped at "midnight UTC" (per Vancanneyt Sander's post above) which still shows a sunspot in the subject area, albeit it is quite faint by that point. Thanks for the tip, Kaimbridge!
  5. Kaimbridge

    Recent Cycle #25 Sunspot

    Another good site is Jan Alvestadʼs Solar Terrestrial Activity Report (“STAR”), which provides a rigorous numerical summary and descriptive analysis, including his own region designations/spot counts, alongside government published data.
  6. theartist

    Recent Cycle #25 Sunspot

    Thank you for that information, and thank you for your website! (Now I'll scurry off to SDO to see if the spot was still visible on the HMI Intensitygram at midnight UTC.😁)
  7. Vancanneyt Sander

    Recent Cycle #25 Sunspot

    The sunspot number is determined by the SIDC, the sunspot regions are determined every midnight UTC by SWPC. If at that time that small region hasn’t been observed it won’t be acknowledged as an official region. If that region would last one more day it would get numbered eventually but as with every new region it depends on when it has emerged. New cycle regions will appear more frequently as the sc24 ends.
  8. theartist

    Recent Cycle #25 Sunspot

    Yesterday (on February 13, 2019), a small sunspot emerged on the solar disk. The 'official' sunspot counters in Belgium counted the spot, http://www.sidc.be/silso/eisnplot . However, space weather sites (e.g., spaceweather.com, sunspotwatch.com) did not acknowledge the spot. Neither did spaceweatherlive.com. Why is that? Yesterday's sunspot appeared to be associated with Cycle #25, as explained further here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wr9HiIClSVM .
  9. Earlier
  10. Marcel de Bont

    Magnetic Pole movement and aurora forecasts

    I actually do not know what exact location NOAA uses for the magnetic north and south pole in their models. These poles are indeed on the move all the time and do affect the location of the auroral oval. @Vancanneyt Sander might know.
  11. The magnetic North pole is moving away from Canada and towards Russia ☹️, atleast on the charts. Some even say it's moving 50+KM per year. This would have quite the effect on the aurora oval I imagine, have models like the NOAA aurora ovation updated to incorporate this?
  12. helios

    Sunspot region at an extremly high latitude?

    SC22 seems to have had a particularly high latitude region https://solarscience.msfc.nasa.gov/images/bfly.gif
  13. Vancanneyt Sander

    Sunspot region at an extremly high latitude?

    The highest observed sunspot region in the northern hemisphere up until now was AR11069 with an latitude of 42°! (and it even produced a M1.2 solar flare!). On the Southern Hemisphere we had two regions AR9518 and AR9523 that where on latitude of 50°!
  14. Vancanneyt Sander

    Solar wind temperature graph

    For the less experienced users, Kelvin is more known then kilo-kelvin. That’s why we used Kelvin in the mouse over. The logaritmic scaling probably has its reasons of swpc, because the old ACE was also using logarithmic scaling we also used it in our graph.
  15. helios

    Solar wind temperature graph

    Cool! (no pun intended) Thanks a lot! One suggestion: It might help the readability if the unit for the mouseover was kilo-Kelvin, or a scientific notation instead of the full 5-6-digit number. And a comment: Years ago I made diagrams for my personal use from the ACE-Satellite whose data is now intermittent: I've preferred a linear Y-axis, but maybe just because I'm used to it. NOAA-SWPC seem to use a logarithmic Y-axis for their diagram.
  16. It looks like a small sunspot region popped up at a remarkably high latitude on the Sun's far side. Not only is this likely a sunspot region that belongs to the new solar cycle 25, it also popped up inside the northern hemisphere polar coronal hole at a really really high latitude. I do not think I ever seen a sunspot region at such a high latitude before. Anyone else who can recall ever seeing a sunspot region at a similar latitude so close to the Sun's north pole? If it´s not a sunspot region, what else could it be?
  17. Vancanneyt Sander

    Solar wind temperature graph

    Hi Helios, On the longer timespan page (with data of the past day), we have added your suggestion. We'll maybe add some more tweaks over the next few days. If you got any comments on the implementation, let us know. The change will also reflect in our iOS and Android app.
  18. Vancanneyt Sander

    Solar wind temperature graph

    Just an update, we've been working on this and here's the preliminary result:
  19. Vancanneyt Sander

    Solar wind temperature graph

    Thx for the feature request, I’ve added it to our project board and we’ll digg into it. Can’t promise anything but I do like the request 😁.
  20. Hi, It would be nice if the website would also show solar wind temperature, as it helps to identify CH influence. Maybe an additional diagram on the "longer timespan" page https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/auroral-activity/real-time-auroral-activity Cheers and thanks for your excellent service.
  21. Kaimbridge

    Discrepancy In X-Ray Data?

    Yup, I see the corrected Saturday values (though Wed-Fri is still jumbled, too! P=| ).
  22. Vancanneyt Sander

    Discrepancy In X-Ray Data?

    Yes, we've noticed this too and made a fix to prevent this. Hopefully some new flares to see if it's all ok now
  23. helios

    Who appreciates this "Solar Quiet" the most?

    There is still a lot of geomagnetic activity during minima. Fewer related to CMEs, but more from coronal holes, which are more prominent during minimum.
  24. CazadorDeWulf

    Who appreciates this "Solar Quiet" the most?

    Wow, thanks for the slightly cynical post! But this is only scratching the surface of what I'm asking
  25. Kaimbridge

    Discrepancy In X-Ray Data?

    Well, SWPC appears at it again: For the past three days they have been graphing GOES‐15 data, but quoting GOES‐14 flare values (yesterday—Fri.25th—they listed the peak flare as B1.2 @ 2222z, which was GOES‐14...GOES‐15 peaked then at A7.1, as your moving “bubble cloud” tracer graph properly listed—though the blackline flare data is GOES‐14ʼs B1.2! So, if it continues today, the 1322z flare will rightfully show “C5.02” (GOES‐15) with the “bubble cloud”, but the blackline of the flare will give GOES‐14ʼs “C4.73”! P=/
  26. Nogar

    Who appreciates this "Solar Quiet" the most?

    The current investment in space weather is relatively low considering it's impact on earth compared to other fields, I wouldn't be afraid of that funding getting any lower.
  27. Are aurora watchers disappointed by the Sun's somewhat lackluster delivery of wind? And are scientists busying themselves with other things for the next long while? Which fields of science or human development are most relieved when geomagnetic-interference becomes less prominent, such as right now? Which fields are reliant on the concurrent activity of our Sun, and become temporarily retired or even at-risk of losing Government funding? I'm sure the answer is a few google searches away but I'd rather someone shared their expertise here! In other words, I am asking you directly Maybe we can discuss this.
  28. It's not direct, but in a sense it has a health effect on me since most of my daily excitement consists of checking the solar wind conditions. It's a real downer when the speed is high and the BT is floored deep into the negative but it's cloudy outside.
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