Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Yesterday
  3. Last week
  4. Engr. Godfrey

    How is Pi2 generated?

    Please can someone explain in details how irregular pulsation type 2 (Pi2) is generated from the solar coronal mass emission? Thanks.
  5. Earlier
  6. Marcel de Bont

    Smartphone Detection of geomagnetic storms

    Welcome John. I would agree with John. While I have no idea if it is possible or not to detect geomagnetic storms with a smartphone, I can imagine it is not an ideal way. The magnetometers that I know of at least are buried under the ground to prevent any kind of outside influences. Even temperature differences can upset the readings.
  7. That is correct. The finalized for example Kp-index is expressed in thirds: 3- 3o and 3+. 3P in decimals would be 3.33333 or 3+. Hope that makes sense.
  8. I think you're right. Though as a programmer, my convention would be to use "GT", "LT" and "EQ" for "Greater Than", "Less Than" and "Equal To"..
  9. Arenʼt they just roundings, where “M”inus is less than, “P”lus is greater than and “Z”ero is equal: E.g., “1.667,'2M'” means actual value is 1.666667 rounded up to 2 (so the actual value is less, or minus); “4.333,'4P'” is 4.333333 rounded down to 4 (actual value is greater, or plus); “3,'3Z'” is exactly 3.0? ~Kaimbridge~
  10. Looking at this JSON file, I see that the Kp estimate field is a float (e.g. 0.33), while the Kp field is a string with a number, suffixed by either a "M", "P" or "Z". I came across the definition of those suffixes a while back, but can't seem to find them now. I seem to recall that they're something like a shorthand (e.g. instead of 0.333..., you'd type 0Z), but I could be wrong. Googling this info is tricky because they're single letters and get lost amongst other letters on the page. So, does anyone know what they are, or can point me towards a link or thread with the explanation?
  11. Mary Carmen Gomez Ramos

    Opiniones sobre qué pasará con el gran PANSSTAR 2017/S3 CUANDO LLEGUE AL SOL

    ¿En que sí pasará en general? Que sucede actualmente con este gigante del espacio ha explotado? A aumentado tamaño?
  12. John Rowlands

    Smartphone Detection of geomagnetic storms

    I think I would be detecting a Kp=7 in my head before a smartphone would! Surely, the problem is not one of absolute sensitivity of the sensor, but its ability to isolate 'domestic' magnetic noise changes from natural variations. I operated a jamjar magnetometer (read: mirror stuck to a bar magnet suspended on a thread) once in a field about 300m from a minor road. It was swamped by passing cars - and even they were pretty few and far between at night. I'm not convinced the smartphone is a good idea. There are so many internet-linked magentometers now that one is much better informed by alerts from any one - or several - of those. Or just by being environmentally aware and looking out the door!
  13. Marcel de Bont

    Opiniones sobre qué pasará con el gran PANSSTAR 2017/S3 CUANDO LLEGUE AL SOL

    What do you want to know exactly? What the comet will do to the Sun or what will happen to the comet?
  14. Que opinan con respecto al grandísimo asteroide que se dirige hacia el sol?
  15. My personal experiences are the same. I've seen a lot of aurora outbursts that start at higher latitudes and expand southwards over a span of several minutes.
  16. At 6:33 UTC over Edmonton, Alberta I witnessed an Auroral substorm after waiting many months and recorded it on real-time video with an ultra wide aperture lens. Though the substorm was a somewhat fainter one the camera revealed vibrant greens and a reddish-pink below racing across the sky. Athabasca, which happens to be 140 KM north of Edmonton features an all sky camera for imaging Aurora. Looking over archives I discovered that this camera picked up a bright auroral substorm beginning at 6:26 UTC, 7 minutes before the one in Edmonton. In previous observations I found that I could see aircraft at altitudes of about 35,000 FT when their above ground position was over 80KM away. This means that the Auroral substorm I recorded over Edmonton and the one recorded over Athabasca were likely the same ones considering how high the Aurora is, and this presents an issue. Using a reference photo I determined the inaccuracy of my camera's time stamp and accounted for it when recording the time of the substorm. The time stamp of the Athabasca camera must be accurate, otherwise it would be seeing into the future in this case. This means the substorm over Athabasca was in fact 7 minutes ahead of the one in Edmonton. Correct me if I am wrong, but when magnetic disturbances occur they first happen at Northern Latitudes and make their way south if strong enough, reinforcing the observation over Edmonton and Athabasca. I will continue to observe for Auroral sub storms over Edmonton and if I can find an even remotely reliable correlation between the Athabasca camera live feed and what is observed in Edmonton then we will be able to predict the most beautiful light show on earth when it is bright enough to break through the light pollution and become visible to the naked eye. This may just be the ramblings of someone desperate to witness the greatest light show on earth while being in a city, but I do believe I could be onto something. I am interested to hear feedback from other community members.
  17. Nogar

    Smartphone Detection of geomagnetic storms

    Interesting, hopefully future phones will be better at this. What would be cool is something that could predict local substorms. I'm usually stuck in a city that happens to be around the KP2 viewing line, though I prefer using the NOAA hemispheric power model as my strength indicator. Many nights a camera with a wide aperture lens will pick up a faint green haze that the eye can't see at around 15GW. I have spent many nights outside but only recently got a substorm that was bright and active over the light pollution that lasted 2 minutes at 22GW. Being able to predict these local storms would be a game changer for people stuck in cities to see Northern Lights.
  18. Ik denk het ook hoor, maar je wilt het zo graag....
  19. De lichtgevende nachtwolken staan er sowieso op lijkt het maar ik denk dat de verkleuring op de foto gewoon een laatste restje zonlicht is wat reflecteert op fijnstof in de atmosfeer, vrij normaal in deze tijd van het jaar. Ik zie hier ook regelmatig verkleuring van dieppurper tot groen aan toe.
  20. JimT

    look at solar activity

    Thank you very much. I was baffled by this, and I appreciate the explanation. JimT
  21. Vancanneyt Sander

    look at solar activity

    When looking at the AIA imagery you would have the idea that there would be a sunspot region but the only thing that's there are the so called Faculae: This is a photospheric feature of the Sun and these also have magnetic field lines just like sunspots have and thus on the AIA imagery you'll see those field lines just like it was a sunspot region. Where a sunspot is cooler and makes the sun darker on those places, faculae works a bit the opposite where it makes the sun on that place a bit brighter. These faculae are best viewed in H-alpha imagery because they don't show up much on visible light.
  22. JimT

    look at solar activity

    I was looking at current "solar activity", I am surprised by the image next to the image labeled: "sunspot regions", the one labeled "solar flares". I mean the image labeled AIA 131 SDO. To me, when you look at the activity on the image, it would seem to me that you would see a sunspot group on the image underneath "sunspot regions"...? Is this unusual? Is it a sign that the suns magnetic field might be very weak and magnetic lines of force cannot penetrate the photosphere? Or is this a more common feature than I think it is? Thanks, JimT
  23. Vancanneyt Sander

    How to change my display name?

    As you can see, it has been changed
  24. oemSpace

    How to change my display name?

    Could you please help me change display name to oemSpace? Thank you very much for assistance (^v^)
  25. Vancanneyt Sander

    How to change my display name?

    Oh yes we didn’t allow it for members, if you let me know what to change it to I’ll do it for you.
  26. Jesterface23

    CME Math

    Well, I though I'd give an update on the current progress of this project. It might be a while until I get to working on this again until a get a pile of work done. I've attempted to contact the correct people at NASA that might take interest in this, and so far there's been no luck with that. I guess this will be a solo project along with the help and ideas from others here until I prove what it can do. I have been working on this a little and I think I have the exact base formula, y=cos(pi*x)-(x/sqrt(pi/2)). I have a modified version for the use of my method of CME arrival time prediction, but I know it's has a ways to go and I'll need to do calculations from the STEREO spacecrafts to finish that also.
  27. Maxime Fiset

    Is the sun abnormally bright at the moment?

    You, sir, are the most patient man I know ❤️
  28. oemSpace

    How to change my display name?

    There is "change" button for email and password, but not available for display name. Do you have any suggestions on where to locate the "change" button for display name? Thank you very much for any suggestions (^v^)
  29. Vancanneyt Sander

    Is the sun abnormally bright at the moment?

    The orbit of the Earth has not changed, we are still at the same orbital position around the Sun. The night sky is still the same, all stars still at the same position...
  1. Load more activity
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?

    Sign Up
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you also agree to our Terms of Use and our Privacy Policy.